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Progress on the Sheet Metal Box and Pan Brake.

The Brake Base and Hinged Board

The Brake Base and Hinged Board

I have mortised the hinges using the fixture I described in “Making a Hinge Mortising Fixture” and have assembled the boards as I described in “The Hinged Plate for a Sheet Metal Bending Brake”.   Like always there is good news and there is bad news.  I think there is enough good to proceed onward. However, as I have stated in previous posts I do not claim to be an expert in anything and most certainly I am learning in the craftsman part, so I will show the bad as well as the good.

A close-up view of the mortised hinge

A close-up view of the mortised hinge

I made the bending brake a little wider than what I drew in the design.  The board I had available was about 3 inches longer than the design so I went with it instead of cutting the board.  This means instead of being able to bend a maximum bend of 18 inches I will be able to go to 21 inches.  I used a scrap piece of Grade A 3/4″ plywood for the base and poplar for the hinge board.  I chose the poplar because it worked very well when I used it for the Do Nothing Machine.  It has fine grain, seems to be relatively strong, and machines nicely.

The 2nd picture shows a close up view of the mortised hinge. I need to do some work on my fixture. First the back edge of the fixture is not parallel with the front edge.  This leaves a little bigger gap on one side of the back of the hinge in comparison to the other edge.  Second, I should not have a gap at all, so once I square up the back of the fixture, I need to shim the front edge.  I did undercut just the right amount and the hinge leaf is level with the board and I did get the width correct.  It is acceptable for this purpose.  It would not be acceptable if I was making cabinets.

Looking down at the edge with the Hinge board raised 90 degrees.

Looking down at the edge with the Hinge board raised 90 degrees.

Now we get to a little more serious problem and one I did not think about. If you notice on the left hand side of the third picture there is a little gap when I raise the hinge board 90 degrees.  The hinge board is not perfectly straight in either direction.  It is close, but not perfect and this leaves a small gap.  For now I am going to proceed as is and experiment with this bending metal.   Should I ever do this again I will check the wood with a straight edge and sand as necessary before doing the mortising and assembly.

The Future Clamping Block.

The Future Clamping Block.

Now… On to the next phase! There are two things which must be done before I am ready for the initial test.  First I need to make some handles for the hinge plate to get some leverage.   I have a couple of scrap 1 X 2 pine about 2 ft long that I will bolt to the back of the board.  One will be mounted near each hinge.

Future clamping piece edge.

Future clamping piece edge.

The second thing is making the clamping block.   I have already cut a piece of scrap popular with a 45 degree angle and have it located in the picture approximately how it will be used.  The thin edge of the popular will not hold up to the forces so I will mount a piece of steel on the bottom side of the clamping board.

The steel is 1″ X 1/8″ and I have several things to do before I mount it.   I need to cut it to length and then grind a nice 45 degree angle on it to make as tight of a bend as possible.   I will start out with an angle grinder, and then finish it with a file and continuously check the edge straightness with a straight edge.   Next I will drill and counter sink some holes to use a couple of flat head screws to attach it to the wood board.   Originally I had intended to mount a second piece of metal to the the other end of the board, but I think I will route a groove in the board and mortise the metal edge into the board.

The final part of the whole project will be to make a clamping assembly.  However, remember my motto…Baby Steps.  Temporarily I will just use a board and a couple of C clamps to clamp the board down and do a test bend or two and see how it works before I commit to the extra work of making the clamping assembly.  By then I will know if this whole idea will work  or if I have made myself a WWJ on the WWW. (World Wide Jerk on the World Wide Web.)

Gary

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Progress on the Sheet Metal Box and Pan Brake.” by Create-and-Make.com is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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